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Table 2 Description of pain in the sample (N = 561) and differences between woman and men

From: Stress, pain, and work affiliation are strongly associated with health-related quality of life in parents of 14–15-year-old adolescents

  All
N = 561
Mothers
N = 426
Fathers
N = 125
P value
Having pain today     0.297
Yes 56 (19%) 103 (24%) 24 (19%)  
No 240 (81%) 333 (76%) 101 (81%)  
Average pain scorea 1.6 (1.8) 1.8 (1.9) 1.0 (0.5) < 0.001
Pain interference, activityb 2.6 (2.2) 2.6 (2.2) 2.3 (2.0) 0.269
Pain interference, emotionsb 2.7 (2.0) 2.8 (2.1) 2.4 (1.9) 0.147
Pain duration     0.010
No pain 223 (40%) 159 (37%) 64 (51%)  
 ≤ 3 months 110 (19%) 88 (20%) 22 (18%)  
> 3 months 228 (41%) 89 (42%) 39 (31%)  
Pain analgesics in the past 4 weeks
Yes 326 (58%) 263 (61%) 62 (50%) 0.029
No 235 (42%) 172 (39%) 63 (50%)  
Frequency of pain analgesics in the past 4 weeks     0.635
Daily 26 (8%) 21 (8%) 5 (8%)  
Every week, but not daily 78 (24%) 78 (25%) 12 (19%)  
Less often than every week 219 (67%) 174 (66%) 45 (73%)  
No intake 3 (1%) 3 (1%) 0  
Family pain     0.032
Yes 230 (41%) 191 (44%) 39 (31%)  
No 269 (48%) 197 (45%) 72 (58%)  
Don’t know 62 (11%) 48 (11%) 14 (11%)  
Chronic illness     0.383
Yes 128 (25%) 101 (23%) 27 (22%)  
No 423 (75%) 329 (76%) 94 (75%)  
Don’t know 10 (2%) 6 (1%) 4 (3%)  
  1. Categorical data are presented as number (%) and continuous variables as mean (SD). Chi-square tests were used to compare differences in categorical variables and independent t tests for continuous data)
  2. aRange: 0–10, where 10 indicates pain as bad as can be imagined
  3. bRange 0–10, where 10 indicates complete interference of pain